Displaying items by tag: club

Thursday, 25 January 2018 09:24

NYC superclub 1 OAK opening in Dubai this February

Another world-class nightclub is coming to Dubai, and it’s one with a big reputation.

Joining the ranks of Dome and BASE as recent additions to the city’s nightlife scene (as well as Cannes superclub Gotha coming soon), New York City hotspot 1 OAK is set to land in Dubai in late-February.

It’s making big claims about bringing a “world-class nightlife venue” to Dubai, and the early image renderings suggest we’re in for an edgy, dark look. Ooh, we approve.

And it looks like there’s reason to get excited, too.

The team behind 1 OAK are claiming celebrity fans of the top NYC hangout will be travelling to the emirate specifically for the launch – name-dropping famous geusts like Beyoncé, Jay-Z, Katy Perry, Kanye West, Rihanna and more.

The reason? Because the “opening will feature a line-up of international artists”, and we’re excited to find out exactly who’s being lined up.

It’s opening up in the JW Marriott Marquis Business Bay, already home to top spots like The Vault, Bridgewater Tavern, Café Artois and Square, and will take the place of former Dubai favourite VIP Room.

As you’d expect from a trendy NYC club with presence across the US, the guys behind 1 OAK are making some pretty huge claims. “With the launch of 1 OAK, we are starting a new era for Dubai’s nightlife scene,” says CEO of Bulldozer Group Evgeny Kuzin. “We wanted to create something unique, while maintaining style and substance, for Dubai’s elite social crowd.”

So, mark your calendars, this hot new spot is ready to land, and we can’t wait.

Opening late-February 2018. JW Marriott Marquis Dubai, Business Bay, www.1oaknyc.com/1-oak-dubai-coming-soon

Source: Timeoutdubai.comimeoutdubai.com

Published in News

Berlin's nightlife is getting an unlikely supporter from its town hall, which is stepping in to defend its legendary techno scene.

It’s a familiar story across the Western world: a heated property market and complaints from the neighbours are squeezing nightlife in the big city. But in Berlin — known for its nightlife and understated cool — the town hall is stepping in to defend its legendary techno scene.

“Techno culture has given so much to Berlin. Using some taxpayer money to support it is the least we can do,” says local Greens party lawmaker Georg Koessler, the initiative’s most ardent supporter. City representatives are set to approve on Thursday a million-euro ($1.2 million) fund to cover soundproofing and additional staff to cool partygoers’ exuberance, a big gesture for the chronically indebted administration.

They hope the cash can help brake a wave of closures that have struck in recent years. Since 2011, 170 clubs have shut down their lasers, sound systems and smoke machines for good. That leaves some 500 for the 3.5 million people of Germany’s largest city and the armies of tourists disgorged from trains, planes and buses each weekend — more than 12.7 million in 2016, according to official statistics.

“Politicians used to talk about Berlin clubs as something nice on the fringes,” 32-year-old Koessler — who still calls himself a dedicated clubber — points out. “But very surprisingly, even our opponents in the (conservative) CDU are suddenly very passionate about this subject, which they call the ‘night economy’,” he adds.
 
Late-Night Lobby 
 
Many clubs sprang up after German reunification in 1990 in derelict or abandoned industrial spaces in the once-divided city’s east. Now with 30 years of experience, club owners won’t limit themselves to waiting around for one-off handouts from city authorities. “We’re aware of the power we have, so we press home the benefit the city draws from us, from tourism to the property market to startups,” says Lutz Leichsenring, spokesman for the Club Commission which counts some 220 of the city’s best-known establishments among its ranks.

The latest campaign is for recognition as artistic venues, which could grant techno havens a seven percent VAT rate rather than the 19% paid by bars and restaurants. Such cash incentives underpin noble sentiments about keeping the sacred techno flame alight. “We want to stay on the sharp edge of contemporary music culture,” says Leichsenring.

“If you’re offering ‘free entry for ladies’ or ‘buy one get one free’ on beer, we’re (Club Commission) not going to spring to your defence.” Techno pilgrimage site Berghain was the first to talk its tax rate down in 2016, convincing the state that clubgoers came for its line-ups of star DJs rather than booze, sex and drugs.

But Leichsenring argues that securing a tax break would be even more important for smaller venues without thousands besieging their doors each weekend. “Big clubs like Berghain, which employs 200 people, are at least profitable, they can rely on their box office and the bar,” he says.

Nurturing art means clubs have to take risks, also musically speaking, and taking risk is always an economic question that’s especially off-putting for those only just clinging to life, Leichsenring said.

Without the economic security to test out exciting new musical departures, the edgy, avant-garde feel that made Berlin nights out legendary across Europe and beyond could disappear.

Squeezed out?

Both supply of and demand for world-class nightlife remain in abundance in the city on the river Spree for now. But the Club Commission worries that mass party tourism, insistent noise complaints and inexorably rising rents will push the city past its peak and into terminal decline. The gathering pace of gentrification in the capital could be “the death of clubs”, Leichsenring fears.

Families on the balconies of their new-build apartment blocks are often loath to endure the beats pulsing endlessly into the night from graffiti-spattered former warehouses or factories. Politicians should, however, remember the economic contribution that partying makes to the cash-strapped capital, the Club Commission insists.

“Let’s be honest, young people aren’t coming to Berlin at weekends in such numbers because there are nice shopping centres,” Leichsenring points out.

Source:http://www.hindustantimes.com

Published in News

Put on your red shoes and dance the opposite of the blues — Mayor de Blasio has officially repealed the city’s cabaret law, which outlawed dancing in most city bars.

“It's 2017,” Mayor de Blasio said at a signing ceremony Monday night. “There should not be a law in New York City against dancing.”

“I'm ready to break out into any impromptu dancing tonight,” Councilman Rafael Espinal, who introduced the repeal into the City Council, told the Daily News.

The cabaret law prohibited cutting a rug without a cabaret license — which fewer than 100 of the 26,000 bars and restaurants in the city have.

Olympia Kazi, a member of the NYC Artists Coalition and the advocacy group Let NYC Dance, said it was “basically a ban on social dancing.”

“Social dancing should not be regulated. That's an expression — a fundamental expression of human beings, and it should not be criminalized,” she said.

But for decades, it was — starting in 1926, when it went into effect mainly to go after Harlem jazz clubs where black and white patrons freely mixed.

And even more recently, the rule was selectively enforced to bust up bars patronized by lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people, as well as bars and clubs in communities of color, critics say.

Espinal — who represents the nightlife-rich neighborhood of Bushwick, where the mayor signed the bill at nightclub and music venue Elsewhere — said the law has had a “notoriously negative impact on nightlife in general, but mostly nightlife that's patronized by communities of color, the LGBT community and other marginalized communities.”

“I think now more than ever, especially given our current political climate in Washington, we should be focusing on also doing away with laws that have a history of suppressing or oppressing New Yorkers,” Espinal continued.

There are still other legal challenges to zoning — including archaic zoning requirements that Kazi said they’ll continue to lobby to be amended.

It’s not the city’s only effort to cozy up to the nightlife world — in September, de Blasio signed a bill establishing an Office of Nightlife to be headed by the city’s most in-demand job, the Night Mayor. The top nightlife official has not yet been chosen. That bill, too, was introduced by Espinal.

“I feel that New York City's nightlife is an integral part of our identity and over the years and decades, there have been so many rules and regulations that have only hampered the potential to flourish,” he said.

Published in News
Tuesday, 17 October 2017 13:48

Altromondo Studios

 
Disco
Published in Guía Nocturna
Tuesday, 03 May 2016 16:16

World's 100 Best Clubs

1

2018

# CLUB COUNTRY CITY
1 Spain Ibiza
2 Ushuaïa Spain Ibiza
3 Omnia USA Las Vegas
4 Green Valley Brazil Camboriú
5 Cavalli Club Dubai UAE Dubai
6 DC10 Spain Ibiza
7 Amnesia Spain Ibiza
8 Pacha Ibiza Spain Ibiza
9 Hakkasan USA Las Vegas
10 Marquee USA Las Vegas
11 Colosseum Indonesia Jakarta
12 Zouk Singapore Singapore
13 E11even USA Miami
14 Ministry of Sound UK London
15 Echostage USA Washington D.C.
16 Cavo Paradiso Greece Mykonos
17 Academy USA Los Angeles
18 Space USA Miami
19 Baia Imperiale Italy Gabicce
20 Opium Barcelona Spain Barcelona
21 Altromondo Italy Rimini
22 Heart Spain Ibiza
23 LAVO USA New York City
24 Bootshaus Germany Cologne
25 Exchange USA Los Angeles
26 Versuz Belgium Hasselt
27 Studio 338 UK London
28 Drai's USA Las Vegas
29 Octagon South Korea  Seoul
30 Warung Brazil Itajai
31 LIV USA Miami
32 Fabric UK London
33 Shôko Spain Barcelona
34 Womb Japan Tokyo
35 Cocoricò Italy Riccione
36 Levels China Hong Kong
37 Cove Philippines Manila
38 Omni Taiwan Tapei
39 Panama Holland Amsterdam
40 Digital UK Newcastle
41 Blue Marlin Ibiza Spain Ibiza
42 Marquee New South Wales Sydney
43 XS USA Las Vegas
44 Avalon USA Los Angeles
45 Theatro Morocco Marakech
46 Blue Marlin Ibiza UAE Abu Dhabi
47 ONYX Thailand Bangkok
48 Fabrik Spain Madrid
49 Olivia Valère Spain Marbella
50 Privilege Brazil Búzios
51 Culture Club Revelin Croatia Dubrovnik
52 Gianpula Malta Rabat
53 The Light USA Las Vegas
54 Pacha Barcelona Spain Barcelona
55 Illuzion Thailand Phuket
56 Ageha Japan  Tokyo
57 Laroc Brazil Valinhos
58 Oqtagon Philippines Cebu
59 Roxy Czech Republic Prague
60 Riobo Italy Gallipoli
61 D! Club Switzerland Lausanne
62 Lío Spain Ibiza
63 Rex Club France Paris
64 Papaya Croatia Novalja
65 Port Du Soleil Sweden Gothenburg
66 Ocean Beach Ibiza Spain Ibiza
67 Base UAE Dubai
68 Sala Apolo Spain Barcelona
69 Insanity Thailand Bangkok
70 Lost Beach Club Ecuador Montañita
71 Lux Fragil Portugal  Lisbon
72 Retro Music Hall Czech Republic Prague
73 Carpe Diem Lounge Spain Barcelona
74 Volar China Hong Kong
75 Motion UK Bristol
76 Shimmy Beach Club South Africa Cape Town
77 Watergate Germany Berlin
78 Cacao Beach Club Bulgaria Nesebar
79 EGG UK  London
80 Café Mambo Ibiza Spain Ibiza
81 CODA Canada Toronto
82 Club La Vela USA Panama City Beach
83 Printworks UK London
84 Bora Bora Ibiza Spain Ibiza
85 Fratelli Romania Bucharest
86 Concrete  France Paris
87 Armando Records Colombia Bogotá
88 Privilege Ibiza Spain Ibiza
89 XOYO UK London
90 Temple USA San Francisco
91 Samsara Beach Club Italy Gallipoli
92 Level 27 Poland Warsaw
93 Propaganda Russia Moscow
94 Kitty Su India New Delhi
95 Opium Madrid Spain Madrid
96 Nassau Beach Club Spain Ibiza
97 De School  Holland Amsterdam 
98 Andrés Carne de Res Colombia Chía
99 Biloba Spain Lleida
100 Jet Argentina Buenos Aires
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